The National Center on Education, Disability and Juvenile Justice
  
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Publications

The National Center on Education, Disability and Juvenile Justice

(Scroll down for descriptions of publications)

Differential Treatment of African American Youth
Alternative Education: From a "Last Chance" to a Proactive Model
Improving Education Services for Students in Detention and Confinement Facilities
Collaborate to Educate: Special Education in Juvenile Correctional Facilities
School Failure, Race, and Disability: Promoting Positive Outcomes,
Decreasing Vulnerability for Involvement with the Juvenile Delinquency System

Monograph Series on Education, Disability, and Juvenile Justice
Summary of Class-Action Litigation Involving Special Education Claims in
Juvenile and Adult Correctional Facilities

Promoting Family Involvement
Students with Disabilities in Correctional Facilities
Youth with Disabilities in the Juvenile Justice System
Special Education and the Juvenile Justice System
A Summary of Best Practices in School Reentry for Incarcerated Youth Returning Home
Addressing the Needs of Youth with Disabilities in the Juvenile Justice System:
The Current Status of Evidence Based Research

Education Reduces Crime: Three-State Recidivism Study, Executive Summary
Special Education in Correctional Facilities
Education and Correctional Populations
Education & Incarceration
Reclaiming Incarcerated Youth Through Education
Juvenile Justice Education: “Who is Educating the Youth?"
Educating Youth in the Juvenile Justice System: Results of a
National Survey on State Juvenile Justice Education Standards

 

EDJJ Publications  
Drakeford, W. & Garfinkel, L. (2000). Differential Treatment of African American Youth. Reclaiming Youth. 9(1), 51-52.

This article examines factors within the juvenile justice and mental health systems that contribute to the overrepresentation of African American men and boys in correctional facilities. The authors also discuss recent efforts by lawmakers and academic institutions to address these inequalities.


Leone, P. E. & Drakeford, W. (December 1999). Alternative Education: From a "Last Chance" to a Proactive Model. The Clearing House, 3(2).

The article examines alternative education programs as a proactive response to the needs of children for whom traditional school structures are not effective, and explains the components of alternative education programs that promote academic excellence and high expectations.


Leone, P. E. & Meisel, S. M. (1997). Improving Education Services for Students in Detention and Confinement Facilities. Children's Legal Rights Journal, 17(1), (pp. 1-12).

This article examines the basis for the educational entitlements of incarcerated youth including federal constitutional equal protection claims, compulsory attendance laws and other State requirements, and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act. The authors also discuss litigation that has enforced the educational rights of youth with disabilities in juvenile corrections.


Meisel, S. M., Henderson, K., Cohen, M. & Leone, P. E. (1998). Collaborate to Educate: Special Education in Juvenile Correctional Facilities. In Building Collaboration Between Education and Treatment for At-risk and Delinquent Youth (pp. 59-72). Eastern Kentucky University, Richmond: National Juvenile Detention Association. [Reprinted 2001 as ERIC Document No. 453624]

Collaboration among education and treatment professionals is fundamental to the provision of appropriate special education services for youth at-risk for delinquency and for those in correctional settings. This article directs attention to collaboration as a best practice approach to improving education and special education services for incarcerated youth, and identifies core elements of successful education programs in detention and confinement facilities.


Leone, P. E., et. al. (October, 2003). School Failure, Race, and Disability: Promoting Positive Outcomes, Decreasing Vulnerability for Involvement with the Juvenile Delinquency System. College Park, MD: The National Center on Education, Disability, and Juvenile Justice.

The authors present evidence to support the contention that an underclass of children and youth is being fostered by the failure of the educational system to give them the skills they need to succeed in life. Specifically, the paper examines school failure, disability, and ethnic minority status, and how these factors place children and youth at risk for involvement with the juvenile or adult criminal justice system. The authors identify what works and what doesn't work with respect to improving outcomes for these at-risk youth and those who are clients of the justice system. The paper also discusses how policies for addressing misbehavior and juvenile delinquency might be reframed to focus on evidence-based practices that work. These suggestions provide the basis for a set of recommendations for changing public policies and professional practices.


The National Center on Education, Disability, and Juvenile Justice (July 2002). Monograph Series on Education, Disability, and Juvenile Justice. College Park, MD: The National Center on Education, Disability, and Juvenile Justice.

Developed by the Center for Effective Collaboration and Practice (CECP) in conjunction with EDJJ, this monograph series is a resource that is provided to increase awareness and understanding of the key issues related to youth with disabilities in the juvenile justice system, and youth who are at risk of court involvement. The information in the monographs will be useful for practitioners involved in system-level or facility-level administrative planning, personnel recruitment and development of intervention programs for youth requiring special education services in the justice system, as well as researchers, advocates and family members.


   

National Center on Education, Disability and Juvenile Justice. Summary of Class-Action Litigation Involving Special Education Claims in Juvenile and Adult Correctional Facilities.

EDJJ prepared the "Summary of Class Action Litigation Involving Special Education Claims in Juvenile and Adult Correctional Facilities" to disseminate information to advocates, policy makers, and educators. The Litigation Chart includes links to legal briefs, settlements and other court filings for a number of the cases.


PACER Center, Inc. (1997). Promoting Family Involvement. In Unique Challenges, Hopeful Responses: A Handbook for Professionals Working with Youth with Disabilities in the Juvenile Justice System (2nd Ed.). Minneapolis, MN: Author.

Most studies confirm that maintaining family ties or establishing positive family relationships while youth are incarcerated, contributes to successful transition to the community. This chapter, from a handbook for professionals working in the juvenile justice system, provides an in-depth examination of methods for parent involvement and support for incarcerated youth.

 

   
Other Publications  
Stenhjem, P. (2005) "Youth with Disabilities in the Juvenile Justice System: Prevention and Intervention Strategies," National Center on Secondary Education and Transition.
Burrell, S. & Warboys, L. (2000, July). “Special Education and the Juvenile Justice System,” Juvenile Justice Bulletin. Washington, DC: Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, U.S. Department of Justice.

A significant proportion of youth in the juvenile justice system have education-related disabilities and are eligible for special education and related services under the federal Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). This Bulletin, directed to judges, attorneys and advocates, probation officers, educators, institutional staff, mental health professionals, and service providers, summarized key provisions of federal law and seeks to heighten awareness of special education issues in the juvenile justice system and ensure that youth with disabilities receive the services they need.


JustChildren. (2003, November). A Summary of Best Practices in School Reentry for Incarcerated Youth Returning Home. Charlottesville, VA: Legal Aid Justice Center.

 

Steurer, S. J. and Smith, L. G. Education Reduces Crime: Three-State Recidivism Study, Executive Summary, (February 2003), from the Correctional Education Association and Management & Training Corporation Institute. Full study also available.

 

U. S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, "Special Education in Correctional Facilities,” in Twenty-first Annual Report to Congress on the Implementation of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (1999).

Summarizes the number and characteristics of youth with disabilities in correctional facilities and the provision of special education services to this population.


U. S. Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics (2003). Education and Correctional Populations.

Compares educational attainment of State and Federal prison inmates, jail inmates, and probationers to that of the general population. Educational attainment is also examined for various demographic groups -- including gender, race/ethnicity, age, citizenship, and military service -- and for other social and economic factors. Reasons for dropping out of school are compared for jail inmates and the general population. The report describes the availability of educational programs to inmates in prison and jail and their participation in educational and vocational programs since admission.


Western, B., Schiraldi, V., & Zeidenberg, J. (2003, August). Education & Incarceration, Washington, DC: Justice Policy Institute.

A policy analysis of the benefits of education vs. the costs of incarceration.


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